On April 2, 2007, the Juneau group of the Sierra Club submitted a petition to list Pacific herring in the Lynn Canal, Alaska, area as a threatened or endangered distinct population segment under the criteria of the U.S. Similarity in age composition of Pacific Herring in the Strait of Georgia and Puget Sound supporting discreteness of Georgia Basin Pacific Herring. Pacific Herring spawn along shorelines in intertidal and shallow subtidal zones. This larger group, called Georgia Basin Pacific Herring DPS, consists of more than 40 inshore stocks from Puget Sound and the Strait of Georgia in the U.S. and Canada. In 2014, we determined that listing the Southeast Alaska DPS of Pacific Herring under the ESA was not warranted. However, we further determined that Puget Sound Pacific Herring, including the Cherry Point population, belonged to a larger group of Pacific Herring termed the Georgia Basin Pacific Herring DPS, and that this DPS was neither at risk of extinction, nor likely to become so. Subsequent to the delineation of this DPS in 2001, the area known as the Georgia Basin was officially designated as the “Salish Sea” by the United States Board on Geographic Names in 2009 and by the British Columbia Geographical Names Office in 2010 to honor the local indigenous peoples, the Coast Salish. Maximum size, age at maturity, and longevity vary throughout the coast. In contrast, Pacific Herring in the north (e.g., Bering Sea) obtain a far larger size at a similar age, mature later, and live longer. For COVID-19-related closures, restrictions, and updates see the WDFW COVID-19/Coronavirus response page. Internet Explorer lacks support for the features of this website. They ranged from the previously identified Georgia Basin DPS to a DPS encompassing Pacific Herring from San Diego to Sitka, Alaska. In Southeast Alaska, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game manages the herring fishery on a long-term, sustained yield basis. In 2014, we determined that listing the Southeast Alaska DPS of Pacific Herring under the ESA was not warranted. Coastal Pelagic Species (CPS) Fishery Management Plan, SAFE (Stock Assessment and Fishery Evaluation) CPS document, commercial fisheries for Pacific Herring in California, California Pacific Herring Fishery Management Plan, 2019 ODFW Commercial Fisheries Regulations Synopsis, Washington State Herring Stock Status Report. Maximum length is 10 inches (26 cm) in Puget Sound, British Columbia, and the Beaufort Sea; 13 inches (34 cm) in the Bering Sea; and 9.5 inches (24 cm) in the Gulf of Alaska. Pacific Herring, which occurs in waters off California, Oregon, and Washington, is currently classified as an “ecosystem component species” in the Pacific Fishery Management Council’s Coastal Pelagic Species (CPS) Fishery Management Plan. They are dark blue to olive on their backs and silver on their sides and belly, which makes them hard to see from above and below. We concluded that the Lynn Canal Pacific herring … Herring population abundance trends are very dynamic and are subject to fairly substantial changes on both large and small geographic scales. In 2001, we found that listing Puget Sound Herring as threatened or endangered was not warranted because the population did not constitute a species, subspecies, or distinct population segment (DPS) under the ESA. The decline of some local stocks (principally the Cherry Point stock, and the non-migratory inlet stocks in the eastern Strait of Georgia) is not by itself cause for concern about the long-term viability of the DPS. However, we did note concern about two Pacific Herring stocks within the Georgia Basin (the Cherry Point and Discovery Bay stocks) that have shown marked declines in range and abundance. In 2001, we found that listing Puget Sound Herring as threatened or endangered was not warranted because the population did not constitute a species, subspecies, or distinct population segment (DPS) under the ESA. After spawning, herring return to their summer feeding areas. We determined that these Puget Sound Pacific Herring stocks, including Cherry Point, belonged to a larger group of Pacific Herring. Adults prey mainly on large crustaceans and small fishes. They deposit their eggs on kelp, eelgrass, and other available structures. Young feed mainly on crustaceans, but also eat decapod and mollusk larvae. On February 7, 1996, the U.S. The maximum exploitation rate is 20 percent of the mature biomass, which is consistent with other herring fisheries on the west coast of North America. History. They do not feed from the start of this migration through spawning, a period of up to two weeks. Pacific Herring is a coastal schooling species found on both the eastern and western sides of the Pacific Ocean. In 2008, we found that listing Lynn Canal Pacific Herring population as threatened or endangered under the ESA was not warranted because the population did not constitute a species, subspecies, or DPS under the ESA. The available information suggests that spawning stocks in the Georgia Basin DPS operate as a “metapopulation.” This means that all subpopulations are connected by migration, but some are relatively discrete, with weaker linkages to other subpopulations in the DPS. Pacific Herring typically form large schools from the water’s surface to depths of 1,300 feet. We recognized that these two declining stocks may be vulnerable to extirpation, but concluded that they represent a relatively small portion of the Georgia Basin DPS and do not confer significant risk to Pacific Herring in the Georgia Basin. As part of this finding, we announced that we would conduct a thorough review of the species’ status, and solicited information pertinent to that review. On April 11, 2008, that petition was denied because the Lynn Canal population was not found to qualify as a distinct population segment. In 2004, we received two petitions, one in January and a supplemental petition in May, from the Northwest Ecosystem Alliance and six co-petitioners to find that the Cherry Point Herring population qualifies as a species under the ESA and warrants listing as a threatened or endangered species. Ecological uniqueness of the inshore waters of Puget Sound and the Strait of Georgia supporting the significance of Georgia Basin Pacific Herring to the taxon as a whole. Herring are a foundation species in Southeast Alaska, playing a central role in marine food webs and also of significant importance as a commercial and subsistence species in many communities. Based on information contained in the status review report produced by the BRT, we published a finding (73 FR 19824; April 11, 2008) that listing the Lynn Canal Pacific herring as threatened or endangered under the ESA was not warranted because the population does not constitute a listable entity (species, subspecies, or DPS) under the ESA. A main way in which Pacific herring will be sensitive to climate change is through change in their prey availability and the distribution of appropriate spawning habitat. Current herring fisheries are managed by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game to ensure sustainability and include methods that target both adult fish and roe. In Puget Sound, adult spawners range from 2-15 years in age; however, most are between ages 3 and 7. Learn more about Pacific herring. Cherry Point does not represent a unique or unusual ecological setting for Pacific Herring. Predicted increases in sea surface temperature and changes in upwelling, such as delayed and shorter upwelling seasons, could affect the timing and abundance of available prey for juveniles, though the magnitude of these effects is uncertain. West Coast, Stay informed of all the latest regional news around NOAA Fisheries, How are the Whales Responding to Fewer Tourists in the Waters off Juneau, AK: Summer Survey is Underway to Learn More - Post 2, Supplemental Information for NMFS’s Temporary Rule and Modification of Closure of the Summer Herring Savings Area 2 in the Bering Sea Subarea of the BSAI, Status Reviews of Non-Marine Mammals in Alaska, Environmental Assessment/Regulatory Impact Review/Initial Regulatory Flexibility Analysis for Amendment 16a to the FMP for Groundfish of the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, Report a Stranded or Injured Marine Animal, petition to designate Pacific Herring from Puget Sound, Washington, as a threatened or endangered species under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), we found that listing Puget Sound Herring as threatened or endangered was not warranted, we announced that listing the Cherry Point Pacific Herring population under the ESA was not warranted, petition to designate the Lynn Canal population of Pacific Herring as a threatened or endangered DPS under the ESA, Status Review of Cherry Point Pacific Herring, Petition to List Herring January 2004 Petition to List Herring, Petition to list Pacific Herring and 17 other marine fish species in Puget Sound, Announcement of Listing Determination/Not Warranted, Status Review of Southeast Alaska Herring, Summary of Peer Reviewer Comments and Response for the Status Review of Southeast Alaska Herring, Status Review of Lynn Canal Pacific Herring, herring fisheries are managed by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, management of commercial herring fisheries in Southeast Alaska.